1. "

    When both men and women endorse the cultural ideal of the nineteen-year-old body as not only the highest good, but in effect the only good (“to the exclusion of other characteristics”), they effectively undermine themselves. We would call attention to a further inevitability, even for those young women who embrace their own sexualization: No one struts the nineteen-year-old body forever. Or even for very long.

    And here is the salt rubbed into the wound of that fact: there is always a new crop of nineteen-year-olds coming along. Soon - too soon - the women who not long ago flaunted their own sexuality stand in the shadow of the up and coming, failing now to measure up to the one-dimensional standard of personal worth that they themselves helped institute.

    Data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons cited in the APA report offers a glimpse into the struggles of aging women to remain young looking. Between 2000 and 2005, Botox injections rose from about 750,000 per year to almost 4 million, an increase of 388 percent. Tummy tucks increased from 62,713 to 134,746, an increase of 115 percent. Buttocks lifts rose from 1,356 in the year 2000, to 5,193 in 2005, a 283 percent increase. Most stunningly, in that same five-year period upper arm lifts increased by 3,413 percent, and lower body lifts by 4,010 percent.

    The numbers speak volumes, but Plato said it best: “Beauty is a short-lived tyranny.” Sexualized women in general go through the same exalted-and-trashed cycle that we see in the careers of sexualized celebrities: elevation to a pinnacle, followed soon by an inevitable and swift descent and crash.

    In 2005, for example, the Comedy Channel sponsored a roast of the sex symbol Pamela Anderson. The graphic jokes about her (as the roasters would have it) aging, worn body - her drooping breasts and stretched-out vagina - were tasteless and cruel, even by the reversed standards of the roast in which it is understood that the more savagely attacked the guest, the more highly honored.

    "
    — 

    The Porning of America: The Rise of Porn Culture, What It Means, and Where We Go From Here by Carmine Sarracino and Kevin M. Scott, p. 210 - 211

     

  2. "

    In 1984, participants in a university study of 46 heterosexual male undergraduates rated their partner’s attractiveness lower, after viewing only 26 slides and one 6-minute video of attractive nude females exhibiting sexual behavior.

    In 2000, a study of adolescents showed that a steady use of pornography frequently led to cheating on one’s girlfriend and a greater tolerance of more novel and bizarre sexual material.

    In a 2002 study, 71 male undergraduate students were divided into 3 groups. Each group watched 10-11-minute video segments: a sexually-explicit and degrading film, a sexually explicit educational film, and a non-sexual film. Later the men were placed side-by-side with a woman in a seemingly unrelated social experiment.

    Viewers of the sexually-explicit film displayed more dominance and anxiety, ignored contributions of their partner more often, touched their partner for longer periods of time, and averted their partner’s gaze more compared to viewers of the non-sexual film.

    Viewers of the sexually-explicit and degrading film spent longer periods of time averting their partner’s touch and gazing at their partner’s face, interrupted their partner more, advanced to touch their partner more, and made more sexual references compared to viewers of the sexually-explicit film.

    "
     

  3. Ways you’re likely experiencing the impact of porn culture in your everyday life as a female: being told the appearance of your labia and mons pubis is disgusting (more and more females are getting “labiaplasty” and getting "The Barbie" cut, (x) where all folds are removed to look as smooth as possible), being pressured by your partner(s) to be completely hairless/to fully shave or wax off your mons pubis (consider the growing popularity of the Brazilian wax), [More gender/sex-neutral impacts]: being pressured by your partner(s) to include scripted sex inspired by/based on pornographic material (consider the mainstreaming of BDSM/BDSMs growing popularity), being pressured by your partners to become apart of the pornography itself by having it filmed (consider that a motivation is sometimes that users are more aroused by the voyeuristic sensation of witnessing sex acts on a detached, objectifying level rather than actually, directly engaging with a person on an intimate, physical level).

     
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  5. rapunzul:

    please think about how makeup companies need to perpetuate the idea that women are unattractive and unacceptable without makeup in order to continue to sell products. please think about how capitalism utilizes sexism in order to self-perpetuate. please think about this for five seconds and then stop reblogging makeup tutorials about how to do “eyeliner sharp enough to kill a man.” 

    (via lalalalalalalafuckoff)

     
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  7. The Color of Beauty

    According to a 2008 survey, the models in the New York Fashion Week were: 6% Black, 6% Asian, 1% Latina, 87% White.


    The Colour of Beauty is a shocking short documentary that examines blatant racism in the fashion industry. Apparently, from the industry’s perspective, the black girls who are featured need to look exactly like white girls only that they are painted black.

    Who’s Renee Thompson?

    Renee Thompson is a 24 year old model trying to make it as a top fashion model in New York. She’s got the looks, the walk and the drive. She has been modeling for 10 years around the world and has experienced some degree of success but her dream is to hit the NY Fashion Week runway and become the next big thing. A dream that seems almost impossible at times as door after door gets slammed in her face, all because she’s black

    Renee feels that she is constantly under scrutiny over something she can do nothing about. What’s even worse is the fact that clients expect the black models to be literally flawless– a higher standard than what is set for white models.(x)

     
  8. The Color of Beauty

    According to a 2008 survey, the models in the New York Fashion Week were: 6% Black, 6% Asian, 1% Latina, 87% White.


    The Colour of Beauty is a shocking short documentary that examines blatant racism in the fashion industry. Apparently, from the industry’s perspective, the black girls who are featured need to look exactly like white girls only that they are painted black.

    Who’s Renee Thompson?

    Renee Thompson is a 24 year old model trying to make it as a top fashion model in New York. She’s got the looks, the walk and the drive. She has been modeling for 10 years around the world and has experienced some degree of success but her dream is to hit the NY Fashion Week runway and become the next big thing. A dream that seems almost impossible at times as door after door gets slammed in her face, all because she’s black

    Renee feels that she is constantly under scrutiny over something she can do nothing about. What’s even worse is the fact that clients expect the black models to be literally flawless– a higher standard than what is set for white models.(x)

     
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  10. saintthecla:

    I get the allure of liberal feminism, I really do. I completely understand wanting to feel like you’re in control, like your choices are actually yours to make. Women are told from birth to look a certain way, act a certain way, be a certain way, and latching on to those ideals so tightly that it makes you feel like they were actually your idea all along is so much more comforting than the alternative. I get that. 

    What I don’t get is not growing past it. How long can you really tell yourself that these high heels were your idea before you have to accept that someone else put that idea in your head long before you could even say no?

    (via dragonsupremacy)